Timothy Bert, M.D.

Orthopaedic Surgeon

Specialist in Sports Medicine and Hip Arthroscopy

Hip Arthroscopy Candidate?

Hip Arthroscopy Candidate?
Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure to treat hip labral tears, hip impingement, loose bodies, and gluteal tears. Indications for surgery are for patients with documented labral tears on MR arthrogram or MRI with clinical symptoms consistent with the above diagnosis without evidence of significant arthritis.

Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure to treat hip labral tears, hip impingement, loose bodies, and gluteal tears. Indications for surgery are for patients with documented labral tears on MR arthrogram or MRI with clinical symptoms consistent with the above diagnosis without evidence of significant arthritis. Typical symptoms of a labral tear are pain in the groin, pain with prolonged sitting, pain with hip rotation, and pain with squatting. All patients that I see in clinic are initially treated conservatively which includes physical therapy, NSAID use if the patient prefers, activity modification, and occasionally an intra-articular cortisone injection to diagnose as well as relieve the symptoms of the labral tear. If the patient fails conservative treatment, then a discussion of hip arthroscopy is initiated. The majority of hip arthroscopies are done as an outpatient procedure. The procedure typically takes less than 2 hours to perform. Post-operative recovery includes a period of protected weight bearing on crutches followed by progression to full weight bearing and strengthening. Most patients are able to start a return to running program around the 3 to 4-month time period. Return to full activities occurs around 4 to 5 months. Physical therapy is a big part of a successful recovery and requires a commitment on the patient's end to perform the exercises diligently to maximize their recovery.